Fanfare and Recessional for St. Luke’s

Fanfare and Recessional for St Luke's for organ by David Barton of LichfieldCatalogue Number: AMP-63
Organ
Publisher: Adoro Music Publishing
Difficulty Level: 4-5
Year of Publication: 2011
Duration: 3 minutes
Availability: Out of Print

Please contact the composer for more information.

This festive piece is suitable for any celebratory service, such as Easter, services of dedication, and weddings.

Reviews

‘…it is quite conventional and gives the player no particular technical problems.  At a mere $3.00 it is good value. The composer is very much an English musician, with a wide performing experience in the USA, Ireland, and the UK.  Neither of these pieces needs a large instrument.’

Trevor Webb in RSCM Church Music Quarterly (December 2011)

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Competition, Festival, Exam, Worship, Church, Festival, Christmas, Wedding, Celebration

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Cantabile on ‘Noel Nouvelet’

The Fagus Book of Quiet Voluntaries for Easter which includes the Cantabile on 'Noel Nouvelet' for organ by David Barton of LichfieldOrgan
Publisher: Fagus Music
Difficulty Level: 4-5
Year of Publication: 2010
Duration: 3 minutes
Availability: In Print

In the Fagus Book of Quiet Voluntaries for Easter

Printed Copy: RRP £18.00
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PDF Copy: RRP £13.50
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A short interlude on this traditional Easter carol, suitable for the quieter moments in the season. Also suitable for use at other times of year and would make a nice addition to a concert or recital.

Reviews

‘This collection of 27 pieces provides quieter pieces for use as opening  voluntaries during the Easter season, specifically composed so that the results  ‘should be capable of being played by players of modest ability, or quickly  prepared by those who are more skilled’. The book succeeds in these aims, with  a collection in a wide variety of styles. Chorale and hymn tunes form the  basis; Noël Nouvelet appears four  times, each with a very different approach. Some pieces are quite conventional  in their harmonic approach, others more adventurous, but the standard is  universally good. There is something for everyone, and the use of these pieces  need not be confined to the Easter period. The only non-contemporary composer  included is Pachelbel, represented by  a Partita on Salzburg and a chorale prelude on ‘Christ lag in Todesbanden’. This is a  highly useful collection.’

Trevor Webb in RSCM Church Music Quarterly (March 2012)

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Church, Worship, Easter, Holy Week, Passiontide, Good Friday

Adagio

Adagio for Organ by David Barton of LichfieldCatalogue Number: LMPP1001
Organ
Publisher: Lighthouse Music Publications
Difficulty Level: 3-4
Year of Publication: 2010
Duration: 3 minutes
Availability: In Print

Printed Copy: RRP $6.50
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This short work for organ was originally intended for use during the distribution of Holy Communion. The two versions enable the organist to play either depending on the size of the congregation, and thus avoiding any unnecessary cuts in the performance. Of course, it will serve as a meditative prelude or reflective piece for general use.

Reviews

‘Best described as ‘quite innocuous’, the Adagio is given in two versions…It is nicely constructed and would happily fill a gap of a couple of minutes, or less if the shortened version is used.’

Trevor Webb in RSCM Church Music Quarterly (December 2011)

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Church, Worship, Communion, Eucharist

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Three Holiday Sketches

Three Holiday Sketches for Flute & Piano by David BartonCatalogue Number: PP629
ISMN: M570167616
Flute & Piano
Publisher: Phylloscopus Publications
Difficulty Level: 4-6
Year of Publication: 2007
Duration: 6 minutes
Availability: In Print

Printed Copy: RRP £6.95
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Contents:
1. Holiday Flight
2. Winter Sun
3. Hot Sunny Day

Whether you’re embarking on a winter holiday or a summer holiday, there’s something in these pieces to bring back those holiday memories.

Reviews

‘David Barton was born in 1983 and has already published a number of choral and instrumental pieces in the UK and America. The Three Holiday Sketches are short vignettes entitled ‘Holiday Flight’, ‘Winter Sun’ and ‘Hot Sunny Day’, the last one in particular containing some lively and imaginative ideas…The pieces are about Grade 5 or 6  overall, and these is some effective writing in the piano accompaniments.’

Alison Uren in Pan Magazine

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Teaching, Competition, Festival, Exam

Three Country Pictures

Three Country Pictures for Oboe and Piano by David BartonCatalogue Number: PP630
ISMN: M570167623
Oboe & Piano
Publisher: Phylloscopus Publications
Difficulty Level: 3-6
Year of Publication: 2007
Duration: 8 minutes
Availability: In Print

Printed Copy: RRP £6.95
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Contents:
1. Halcyon Lament
2. Woodland Glade
3. Harvest Time

Three pictures here of English country life from the peaceful woodland glades to the business of the harvest.

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Teaching, Competition, Festival, Exam

We Will Remember Them

We Will Remember Them for flute and piano by David Barton, LichfieldCatalogue Number: WWS291
Flute & Piano
Publisher: BRS Music Inc.
Difficulty Level: 4-6
Year of Publication: 2009
Duration: 6 minutes
Availability: In Print

Printed Copy: RRP $10.00
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Contents:
1. Elegy for a Lost Friend
2. Drifting Memories
3. Fading Recollections

Whilst making poignant concert solos, these three reflective pieces also make good instrumental interludes in worship. Whether we like it or not, our lives are continually shaped by memories; those which we remember fondly, and maybe those which we would rather forget. Whilst the title of this set of pieces comes from the well known poem For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon, they are not exclusively related to remembrance. These peaceful, occasionally sentimental and nostalgic, but overall evocative pieces are designed for reflection. The way in which we respond to them will be affected by our own experiences of the world around us. They are suitable for flautists of around Grades 4-6 standard, and will prove a useful addition to the somewhat less-virtuosic side of the repertoire.

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Teaching, Competition, Festival, Exam, Remembrance, Church, Worship

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Four Pictures from Scotland

Four Pictures from Scotland for Clarinet & Piano by David BartonCatalogue Number: WWS292
Clarinet & Piano
Publisher: BRS Music Inc.
Difficulty Level: 4-6
Year of Publication: 2009
Duration: 7 minutes
Availability: In Print

Printed Copy: RRP $10.00
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Contents:
1. Sleeper to Inverness
2. Loch Maree
3. 28th September, 1879
4. Stirling Castle

From the persistent chugging of the Sleeper to Inverness to the peaceful serenity of Loch Marie; and from the despondant 28th September, 1879 to the uplifting and strident Stirling Castle, this publication provides a diverse selection of musical scenes from Scotland.

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Teaching, Competition, Festival, Exam

Imagination

ImaginationCatalogue Number: DBM1502
Flute & Piano
Publisher: David Barton Music
Difficulty Level: 6-7
Year of Publication: 2011
Duration: 5 minutes
Availability: In Stock

PDF download: £3.00
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We all know how easy it is for the mind to play tricks on us. This piece started out as being titled ‘The Power of Imagination’; now just shortened to ‘Imagination’, the flute and piano weave mysteriously in and out of each other, never quite being sure what’s real and what isn’t. But this isn’t a sinister piece, rather a representation in music of images conjured up by the power of our imaginations.

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Teaching, Competition, Festival, Exam

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Sutton Park Suite

Sutton Park SuiteCatalogue Number: DBM1505
Clarinet & Piano
Publisher: David Barton Music
Difficulty Level: 5-7
Year of Publication: 2011
Duration: 9 minutes
Availability: In Stock

PDF download: £6.00
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Contents:
1. Prelude: Royal Oak Gate
2. Pastorale: Longmoor Pool
3. Danza: Jamboree
4. Epilogue: Ancient Woodlands

Sutton Park Suite paints a musical picture of the many faces of this much-loved beauty spot near Sutton Coldfield in the West Midlands. Covering some 2,400 acres it is one of the largest urban parks in Europe, and the largest outside of a capital city. The pieces include sketches of Longmoor Pool (II. Pastorale) which dates from the 18th century, and Royal Oak Gate (I. Prelude), and both aim to encompass the wide variety of scenes which the area provides. Also mentioned are the park’s ancient woodlands (IV. Epilogue) and the jamboree celebrating the 50th anniversary of Scouting (III. Danza).

Whilst designed to be played as a complete set, the second and third movements work very well individually.

Reviews

‘Up and coming composer David Barton lives in Staffordshire and these four very different movements are based on features in and around Sutton Park, just over the West Midlands border, near Sutton Coldfield. ‘Royal Oak Gate’ is a short prelude, fairly stately. ‘Longmoor Pool’ is a pastoral evocation of the 18th century. ‘Jamboree’, a dance, represents the 50th anniversary of scouting and is a tricky but effective number in 5/4. After the excitement of the celebrativo direction, the final epilogue ‘Ancient Woodlands’ is a slow, gentle number with a request to produce a sound ‘almost like a chant’. This is not a dazzling finish but a sombre end, mezzo piano throughout, simple rhythms over sustained chords. The whole work is roughly nine minutes long and probably works best with all four movements although ‘Jamboree’ may work well as a separate movement.’

Stephanie Reeve in Clarinet & Saxophone

Potential Uses

Concert, Recital, Teaching, Competition, Festival, Exam

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Getting the most out of exams

Getting the most out of exams
Girl playing the fluteAt some time or another, most of the pupils I teach (including adults) want to get an independent assessment of their progress – an exam. With another session of exams just round the corner, what can you do to get the most out of the experience?

Preparation

Firstly, find out in plenty of time when the session and closing dates are and work towards these. Exams usually take place three times a year in February/March, June/July and November/December. The closing dates for entries are usually about six weeks before the  first exam in the session. It’s worth remembering that the sessions come round quite quickly. With my own flute, piano and singing pupils here in Lichfield, we’re already thinking about exams in the summer – the closing date is just after Easter which leaves only about 10 lessons.

Secondly, be very clear what the requirements are. Either get a copy of the syllabus (the requirements are printed inside the cover of some exam books too) or make a bullet point list – stick it up somewhere prominent. Keep an eye on it as you prepare, particularly if you don’t have a teacher or if you’re not having regular lessons. Set some targets too – if, for example, there are a lot of scales then divide them up early on to learn.

In most exams there are likely to be three pieces (four for Grades 6-8 Singing), scales and arpeggios (an unaccompanied traditional song if you’re a singer), sight-reading/singing and aural tests. Make sure that you don’t leave some elements until the last minute. It’s easy to think “oh, aural’s only worth 18 marks..” but so often, it is the scores in the supporting tests which can tip the balance between a pass and a merit, or a merit and a distinction. If you have a weakness in one of the aural tests for example, identify it early on.

Do try wherever possible to play or sing your pieces to other people in the run-up to the exam itself. This might be to friends or family, or at small informal performances or concerts. In my experience, it’s not good to go into an exam situation having never played them to anyone other than your teacher. You can also record or even video your performances which gives a surprisingly realistic simulation of exam conditions.

The exam itself

Above all, enjoy it! I know that’s easy to say, but overall, taking an exam should be a positive experience (even if you’re a nervous wreck on the day!). There are a few things you can do to make sure that the exam itself is as stress-free as possible.

Don’t leave things until the last minute; I know that when you start your preparations, the exam probably seems an age away, but it’ll be here before you know it. Know where the venue is and how to get there – if you’re not sure, it’s worth making a dummy run before the day to check out routes and parking etc. Leave plenty of time to get to the venue too – there’s nothing more stressful than sitting in a traffic jam watching the minutes tick away.

The night before the exam, get together any books or instruments you need. Generally, I suggest to my pupils not to practise the night before or on the day of the exam – to put it bluntly, if you don’t know it by then, it’s a bit late (and there’s nothing worse than a bad ‘dress rehearsal’ the night before’!) Try and warm up before you go to the exam – this is particularly important for singers, but for other instrumentalists too. Not all exam venues have a warm-up room and you definitely wouldn’t want to go into the exam ‘cold’.

Also remember that hard as it might seem, the examiner does want you to pass (it’s in the Board’s interest because you’re likely to enter for the next exam, pay the higher fee etc. etc…sorry…I’m very cynical!). The examiner is human too – I go to great lengths to remind my pupils to say “Hello” on the way in and “Goodbye” on the way out!  Once you’re in there, all you can do is your best. If you make a mistake, keep going – contrary to popular belief, going back and correcting the mistake doesn’t cancel out the original one. Just keep going and keep focussed – someone who goes back to correct mistakes will always get lower marks than someone who keeps going.

After the exam

Once it’s done, it’s done and you can’t do anything about it. When you come out, you’ll probably be thinking about all the things which went wrong rather than the majority which went right – this is perfectly normal. Try to avoid lengthy post-mortems – what’s done is done. Just sit back, keep playing, and inevitably, wait for the result to come!

Above all, the result and the comments are only a snapshot of your playing. They are not a reflection on your enjoyment of playing the instrument which should never change whatever the result.