Studio Policy FAQs

My monthly payment entitles me to either 40 or 20 lessons per academic year. Does that mean you’ll only be teaching 40 weeks?

No. Your monthly payment entitles you to a minimum of 40 lessons. I am expecting to be available to teach 43-44 weeks per year.


There are only two lessons this month. Do I still have to pay the full amount?

Yes. The payment is the same every month as it’s the equivalent of 40 lessons per year divided equally between the 12 months of each academic year.


I won’t be taking any lessons in August. Do I still have to pay?

Yes. The August payment will cover lessons you’ve already had.


I’m on holiday some of the weeks you’re teaching. Do I have to pay for those lessons?

Because the monthly subscription covers more than just the lesson time, no changes are made to the payments if you’re away; however, as above, I am expecting to offer more than 40 teaching weeks per year, so there will still be opportunity to take those later in the year. Also, don’t forget, you can rearrange your lesson during the same week or fortnight if there’s space available.


If I give 48 hours’ notice for absence, do I still have to pay?

Yes. The 48-hour cancellation policy no longer applies. If you cannot make your lesson, you can rearrange it to a different time that week, although it’s worth remembering that I am expecting to offer more than 40 weeks per year, so there will still be opportunity to take those later in the year.


Can I rearrange my lesson if I can’t make my normal time?

Absolutely. If you can’t make your normal lesson time, you can seek to rearrange it during the same week (or fortnight if you take fortnightly lessons) if there’s space available.


If I’m ill and miss a lesson, do I still have to pay?

Yes. If you cannot make your lesson, you can rearrange it to a different time that week (if there’s space available), although it’s worth remembering that I am expecting to offer more than 40 weeks per year, so there will still be opportunity to take those later in the year.


If you’re not available to teach me, do I still have to pay?

As there are occasionally days when I’m not available to teach, I will endeavour to reschedule those lessons on a future date. Remember, although you pay for the equivalent of 40 lessons per year, I am expecting to offer more than 40 teaching weeks. In the unlikely even I have not been available to offer you a minimum of 40 lessons per year, I will refund you the cost of any remaining lessons.


How will I know how much to pay?

Details of the monthly payments are included on the Studio Policy. Additionally, you will receive an invoice in advance of the start of each month.


How can I pay?

You can pay using any of the normal payment methods. The best option is to set up a Standing Order with your bank for the same amount each month (as payments are due on the 1st of the month, you may find it useful to set it to go out in advance of this to take into account weekends). Most people can now do this using online banking. Alternatively, when you receive your invoice, there will be an option to pay online where you can pay using PayPal or a debit/credit card. You can still pay by card in the lesson, and you can still bring a cheque each month. Try to avoid paying by cash.


Why can’t I just pay per lesson?

Although that’s been the policy up until now, this involves a huge amount of admin on my part. I can find myself dealing with over 1,000 individual payments per year. This policy means you no longer have to write a cheque each week or find the right amount of cash. If you don’t wish to commit to a regular weekly or fortnightly slot in my timetable, I will still be offering ad-hoc bookings, and these can be paid for per lesson.


Why the change?

I believe that by charging on a monthly subscription basis, this better reflects the fact that fees cover much more than the lesson time itself. It also means you know exactly how much you have to pay each month, and it remains the same for the whole academic year. Anyone who is self-employed will know that income is rarely regular; however, if in the future I wish to obtain, for example, a mortgage, I will need to prove some degree of regularity in income. This will allow me to do that.